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The Musical Code between Nature and Nurture: Ecosemiotic and Neurobiological Claims

  • Mark Reybrouck
Part of the Biosemiotics book series (BSEM, volume 1)

This contribution is about sense-making in music. In an attempt to bring together such diverging fields as semiotics and neurobiology, it argues for a processual approach to music, which conceives of ‘music users’ as organisms that ‘cope’ with their environment. It is a position which calls forth ecological and epistemological assumptions and which stresses the importance of a conception of music as dealt with rather than a static conception of music as structure or artefact. As such, it considers music as a sounding and temporal art which appeals to lower-level mechanisms of reactivity, as well as to the acquired mechanisms of sense-making which are the outcome of a learning history. It is argued, further, that there is a continuum between lower level sensory processing and higher-order cognitive elaboration. The musical code, accordingly, holds a hybrid position between innate and wired-in dispositions and higher-level cognitive processing mechanisms. The very concept of code, further, is given some theoretical grounding as well as empirical evidence from the domains of psychophysics, psychobiology, and neurobiology.

Keywords

Cognitive Neuroscience Musical Training Planum Temporale Absolute Pitch Musical Experience 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Springer Science + Business Media B.V 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mark Reybrouck
    • 1
  1. 1.Section of Musicology Blijde-InkomststraatCatholic University of LeuvenBelgium

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