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Timber Inventory and Management—ATLAS

  • John R. Mills
  • Darius M. Adams
Part of the Managing Forest Ecosystems book series (MAFE, volume 14)

The ATLAS model is a framework that allows development of multiscale, customized growth and yield modules. In the Timber Assessment Projection System these modules represent aggregates of stands across a region and ownership with multiple management regimes. ATLAS employs an age class structure to represent the timber inventory for areas managed on both even- and unevenaged silvicultural systems. Inventory is represented by means of strata or units which are aggregations of basic plot-level data to some higher geographic or other descriptive level. Yield projections are derived from type-specific growth models in some regions and from empirical yield relations derived from basic inventory data in other instances. Yield projections are adapted to reflect both even-aged and partial cutting regimes. Allocation of private lands to various levels of management intensity depends on a model of management investment based on estimated land expectations values. Section 6.4 contrasts ATLAS with inventory projection approaches employed in other recent forest sector models.

Keywords

Forest Type Management Unit Yield Table Area Loss Inventory Volume 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • John R. Mills
    • 1
  • Darius M. Adams
    • 2
  1. 1.USDA Forest ServicePacific Northwest Research StationPortlandUSA
  2. 2.Department of Forest ResourcesOregon State UniversityCorvallisUSA

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