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Ethical Issues in Testing and Assessment

  • Donna E. Palladino Schultheiss
  • Graham B. Stead

Career assessment involves a process of gathering information to facilitate career development, assist in understanding and coping with career-related problems or concerns, and facilitate informed career decision-making. Although career assessment often includes the use of psychometric instruments or tests, its focus is much broader. It encompasses assessing all vocationally relevant variables that may influence an individual’s career decisions (Fouad, 1993). Contextual aspects are central to understanding assessment results. One must consider country of origin, language, values, customs, beliefs, the nature of work and the workforce, and other pertinent factors. It also is important to consider the influence of culture on behaviour, and the cultural context of career assessment (Blustein & Ellis, 2000). Culturally specific variables to assess include: racial and ethnic identity, acculturation, worldview, socio-economic status, gender role expectations, family expectations and responsibilities, primary language, and relationships (Fouad, 1993).

Tests are only one aspect of career assessment that are best used with other information about the client and environment. Testing refers to a method of acquiring a sample of behaviour under controlled conditions (Walsh & Betz, 2001). Career instruments or tests also are used as measurement components of research. Thus, they play an important role in furthering our basic knowledge of the career development and decision-making process (Chartrand& Walsh, 2001).

Keywords

American Psychological Association Career Assessment Ethical Code Test Taker Universal Declaration 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Annex: References to Select Ethical Codes

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Copyright information

© Springer Science + Business Media B.V 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Donna E. Palladino Schultheiss
    • 1
  • Graham B. Stead
    • 1
  1. 1.Cleveland State UniversityUSA

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