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Gender is constructed and defined by societies. It refers to membership of a particular category, masculine or feminine, which aligns more or less to the two sexes and highlights the ways in which being male and being female are valued differently and not equally (Bimrose, 2006a). Whilst distinct sets of attributes are associated with the two sexes, these are not fixed. Gender boundaries are fluid. Consider, for example, the ways in which being male or being female have changed over, say, the past 20 year period. It is becoming more socially acceptable for men to enter jobs previously regarded the preserve of women (Lupton, 2006; Simpson, 2005) and undertake childcare and domestic responsibilities (Halford, 2006). Such changes may occur not only within the same society over time, but also across societies during any one period in history.

Keywords

Sexual Harassment Career Development Career Guidance Career Counselling Vocational Behavior 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science + Business Media B.V 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jenny Bimrose
    • 1
  1. 1.University of WarwickUK

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