Training Career Practitioners in the 21st Century

  • Spencer G. Niles
  • Azra Karajic

Formal and informal training programs for career practitioners have increased in both quantity and quality over the past decade. For example, career development facilitator training opportunities have increased substantially during this time period. With an increase in credentialing (e.g., the Global Career Development Facilitator, the Master Career Counselor option via the National Career Development Association) and universities offering training in career development interventions, a growing number of people engage in the delivery of career services.

It is no coincidence that the increasing attention being given to career services comes at a time when the nature of work is changing dramatically (Rifkin, 1995). Increases in corporate downsizing, technological advances, various countries increasingly relying upon outsourcing of numerous occupations, growing numbers of dual-career couples, and a burgeoning contingent workforce all represent changes in the work experience. Those involved in training career practitioners must keep abreast of such changes because they provide indicators as to the challenges confronting workers as they attempt to manage their careers effectively. Knowing the challenges confronting workers enables practitioners to construct interventions that are relevant to the current context. Thus, training experiences for career practitioners must constantly be updated and adjusted so that trainees have relevant knowledge, awareness, and skills to assist people as they attempt to cope with contemporary career concerns.

Keywords

Europe Income Marketing Logical Positivism Argentina 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science + Business Media B.V 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Spencer G. Niles
    • 1
  • Azra Karajic
    • 1
  1. 1.Penn State UniversityUSA

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