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A Technology-Based Application of the Schoolwide Enrichment Model and High-End Learning Theory

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International Handbook on Giftedness

Abstract

Remarkable advances in instructional communication technology (ICT) have now made it possible to provide high levels of enrichment services to students online. This chapter describes an Internet-based enrichment program based on a high-end learning theory that focuses on the development of creative productivity through the application of knowledge rather than the mere acquisition and storage of knowledge. The program, called Renzulli Learning System (RLS), extends the pedagogy of the SEM to various forms of enrichment as well as first-hand investigative and creative endeavors. In this chapter, a brief overview is provided about the Schoolwide Enrichment Model (SEM), the organizational framework upon which the RLS is based. This section will be followed by summaries of the Three-Ring Conception of Giftedness and the Enrichment Triad Model, the two theories underlying SEM, and the final section presents a detailed description of the Renzulli Learning System.

One hesitates using the word revolutionary in this day of technological advancements by the hour, but the word did occur to me as I reviewed the Renzulli Learning System. It provides a new level of differentiation and engagement.

John Lounsbury

National Middle School Association

Georgia College & State University

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Renzulli, J.S., Reis, S.M. (2009). A Technology-Based Application of the Schoolwide Enrichment Model and High-End Learning Theory. In: Shavinina, L.V. (eds) International Handbook on Giftedness. Springer, Dordrecht. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4020-6162-2_62

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