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Two-Dimensional Slope Failure in the Centrifugal Field

  • Wu Min-Hao 
  • Ling Hoe. I. 
  • Pamuk Ahmet. 
  • Dov Leshchinsky
Conference paper
Part of the Solid Mechanics and Its Applications book series (SMIA, volume 146)

Abstract

Slope failures occurred frequently that resulted in the loss of lives and properties. Slope performed differently with respect to different slope angles, heights and soil properties. In this study, the centrifuge facility was used to simulate slope failure under two dimensional (2-D) conditions. Clean Nevada sand and its mixtures with different percentages of fines (up to 30% or so) were used. The slope angles were 60, 75 and 90 degrees. Slope failure was generated by increasing the gravity. A laser displacement transducer was used to measure the settlement at the top of the slopes that indicated initiation of failure. A video camera was used in front of the slope to trace failure and movement of failure soil mass. At the end of testing, the slope was cut to obtain the configurations of failure surface. The results showed a normalized behavior of slope failure surface. The normalized behavior tended to drift for less steep slope. Vertical slopes also showed shallower failure surface compared to 75- and 60-degree slopes.

Keywords

Slope Angle Slope Failure Failure Surface Triaxial Test Direct Shear Test 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Wu Min-Hao 
    • 1
  • Ling Hoe. I. 
    • 1
  • Pamuk Ahmet. 
    • 1
  • Dov Leshchinsky
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Civil Engineering and Engineering MechanicsColumbia UniversityNew YorkUSA
  2. 2.Department of Civil EngineeringUniversity of DelawareNewarkUSA

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