A novel membrane protein conserved in plants and animals is important for ethylene receptor function in Arabidopsis thaliana

  • J. S. Resnick
  • M. Rivarola
  • C. K. Wen
  • J. A. Shockey
  • Caren Chang

The known components involved in ethylene signaling generally form a linear pathway model, beginning with ethylene binding at the receptors and resulting in the activation of ethylene-response genes (Guo and Ecker, 2004). Elucidation of this pathway has been possible through the isolation of genetic mutants displaying altered responses to ethylene. Arabidopsis seedlings grown in the dark in the presence of ethylene exhibit a “triple response”, which consists of inhibition of hypocotyl and root elongation, radial swelling of the hypocotyl, and an exaggerated curvature of the apical hook (Bleecker et al., 1988; Guzman and Ecker, 1990).

Keywords

Tyrosine Plasmodium Ligase 

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Copyright information

© Springer 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. S. Resnick
    • 1
  • M. Rivarola
    • 1
  • C. K. Wen
    • 2
  • J. A. Shockey
    • 1
  • Caren Chang
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Cell Biology and Molecular GeneticsUniversity of MarylandUSA
  2. 2.National Key Laboratory of Plant Molecular GeneticsInstitute of Plant Physiology and EcologyChina

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