Site assessment of road-edge grassed channels for highway drainage

  • M Escarameia
  • A J Todd
Conference paper
Part of the Alliance For Global Sustainability Bookseries book series (AGSB, volume 12)

Worldwide, grass-lined channels (or swales) have long been used for the drainage of surface runoff from roads and motorways. Recently, the emphasis on sustainability and on minimization of impact on the environment have prompted the spread of swales as a drainage option which also provides flow attenuation and improvement of the quality of the discharged water. However, swales and other traditional grass-lined channels are typically too deep and steep-sided, from a vehicle safety view point, for use adjacent to carriageways.

Keywords

Permeability Nickel Attenuation Polyethylene Hydrocarbon 

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References

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    DMRB 4.2 (2006) Grassed surface water channels for highway runoff. HA119, vol. 4, Section 2, Part 9. The Stationery Office, UKGoogle Scholar
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    Escarameia M, Todd AJ (2006) Grassed surface water channels for road drainage. Project Report. HR Wallingford Report SR662, February 2006Google Scholar
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    Escarameia M, Gasowski Y, May R (2002) Grassed drainage channels - hydraulic resistance characteristics. Proc. ICE Water Marit Eng 154 (4): 333-341Google Scholar
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    BSI (2002) Separator systems for light liquids (e.g., oil and petrol). BS EN 858, British Standards Institute, LondonGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • M Escarameia
    • 1
  • A J Todd
    • 2
  1. 1.Engineering Hydraulics and StructuresHR WallingfordHowbery ParkUK
  2. 2.Atkins (formerly of TRL)Cornerstone HouseUK

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