Abstract

Because of their structural nature, teeth undoubtedly constitute the most abundant fossil evidence for mammal evolution, and are the most investigated elements in paleoanthropology. Recent and ongoing advances in developmental biology, quantitative genetics, and structural microanatomy illustrate the extraordinary amount of information preserved in their tissues (e.g., Dean, 2000; Jernvall and Jung, 2000; Jung et al., 2003; Hlusko, 2004; Mitsiadis and Smith, 2006; Pereira et al., 2006).

Keywords

Assure Pleistocene Paleontology 

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Copyright information

© Springer 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Laboratoire de Géobiologie, Biochronologie et Paléontologie humaineUniversité de PoitiersPoitiersFrance
  2. 2.Department of Human EvolutionMax Planck Institute for Evolutionary AnthropologyLeipzigGermany
  3. 3.Center for the Study of Human Origins, Department of AnthropologyNew York UniversityNew YorkUSA

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