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METARHIZIUM ANISOPLIAE AS A MODEL FOR STUDYING BIOINSECTICIDAL HOST PATHOGEN INTERACTIONS

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Novel Biotechnologies for Biocontrol Agent Enhancement and Management

Part of the book series: NATO Security through Science Series ((NASTA))

Abstract

Molecular biology methods have elucidated pathogenic processes in several biocontrol agents including one of the most commonly applied entomopathogenic fungi, Metarhizium anisopliae. In this article I will describe how a combination of EST and microarray approaches, gene disruption strategies, manipulation of gene expression and use of marker genes has: (1) identified and characterized genes involved in infection; (2) manipulated the genes of the pathogen to improve biocontrol performance; (3) allowed expression of a neurotoxin from the scorpion Androctonus australis; (4) allowed assessments of environmental risks posed by these modifications and (5) identified differences in genic constituents and gene expression that account for differences between strains.

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Leger, R.J. (2007). METARHIZIUM ANISOPLIAE AS A MODEL FOR STUDYING BIOINSECTICIDAL HOST PATHOGEN INTERACTIONS. In: Vurro, M., Gressel, J. (eds) Novel Biotechnologies for Biocontrol Agent Enhancement and Management. NATO Security through Science Series. Springer, Dordrecht. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4020-5799-1_9

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