Advertisement

Effect of inoculation with a strain of Pseudomonas fragi in the growth and phosphorous content of strawberry plants

  • L. Martín
  • E. Velázquez
  • R. Rivas
  • P.F. Mateos
  • E. Martínez-Molina
  • C. Rodríguez-Barrueco
  • A. Peix
Conference paper
Part of the Developments in Plant and Soil Sciences book series (DPSS, volume 102)

Abstract

Within genus Pseudomonas, several species are able to solubilize phosphate in plates and some of these species are also able to mobilize phosphorous to plants. In this work we isolated a strain, SAPA2, from the rhizosphere of barley plants growing in a soil from Northern Spain. This strain was able to solubilize phosphates in plates forming great halos of solubilization in 24 h. Moreover, this strain retained its ability to solubilize phosphate after five culture passes. The 16S rRNA sequence of this strain showed a similarity of 99.9% with that of Pseudomonas fragi. The inoculation of strawberry plants with this strain was carried out in growth chamber applying 10 ml of a suspension containing 108 UFC/ml to each plant. According to the results obtained, the plants inoculated with this strain growing in a soil amended with insoluble phosphate had a phosphorous content significantly higher than uninoculated plants growing in soil with or without insoluble phosphates. Therefore, the strain SAPA2 promotes phosphorous mobilization to strawberry plants. Therefore, the inoculation of plants with suitable phosphate solubilizing bacteria can increase the crop yield and allows a better exploitation of natural soil resources.

Key words

phosphate solubilization plant growth promotion Pseudomonas strawberry 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Antoun H, Beauchamp C J, Goussard N, Chabot R and Lalande R 1998 Potential of Rhizobium and Bradyrhizobium species as growth promoting rhizobacteria on non-legumes: effect on radishes (Raphanus sativus L.). Plant Soil 204, 57–67.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Behrendt U, Ulrich A, Schumann P, Erler W, Burghardt J and Seyfarth W 1999 A taxonomic study of bacteria isolated from grasses: a proposed new species Pseudomonas graminis sp. nov. Int. J. Syst. Bacteriol. 49, 297–308.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Chabot R, Antoun H and Cescas M P 1993 Grotwh stimulation of corn and romiane lettuce by microorganisms solubilizing inorganic phosphorous. Can. J. Microbiol. 39, 941–947.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Chabot R, Antoun H and Cescas M P 1996 Growth promotion of maize and lettuce by phosphate-solubilizing Rhizobium leguminosarum biovar phaseoli. Plant Soil 184, 311–321.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Chabot R, Beauchamp C J, Kloepper J W and Antoun H 1998 Effect of phosphorous on root colonization and growth promotion of maize by bioluminiscent mutants of phos-phate-solubilizing Rhizobium leguminosarum biovar. phaseoli. Soil Biol. Biochem. 30, 1615–1618.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. de Freitas J R, Banerjee M R and Germida J J 1997 Phosphate-solubilizing rhizobacteria enhance the growth and yield but not phosphorous uptake in canola (Brassica napus L.). Biol. Fertil. Soils 24, 358–364.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Deubel A, Gransee A. and Merbach W 2000 Transformation of organic rhizodepositions by rhizosphere bacteria and its influence on the availability of tertiary calcium phosphate. J. Plant Nutr. Soil Sci. 163, 387–392.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. Di-Simine C D, Sayer J A and Gadd G M 1998 Solubilization of Zinc phosphate by a strain of Pseudomonas fluorescens isolated from a forest soil. Biol. Fertil. Soils 28, 87–94.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. Jonhson F J 1990 Detection method of nitrogen (total) in fertilizers. In Methods of Analysis of the Association of Official Analytical Chemists. Ed. K Elrich. pp. 17–19. Association of Official Analytical Chemists, USA.Google Scholar
  10. Kim K Y, Jordan D and McDonald G A 1998 Effect of phosphate solubilizing bacteria and vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizae on tomato growth and soil microbial activity. Biol. Fertil. Soils 26, 79–87.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. Kimura M 1980 A simple method for estimating evolutionary rates of base substitutions through comparative studies of nucleotide sequences. J. Mol. Evol. 16, 111–120.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. Kumar V and Singh K P 2001 Enriching vermicompost by nitrogen fixing and phosphate solubilizing bacteria. Biores. Technol. 76, 173–175.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. Kumar S, Tamura K, Jakobsen I B and Nei M 2001 Molecular Evolutionary Genetics Analysis Software. Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona, USA.Google Scholar
  14. Manna M C, Ghosh P K, Ghosh B N and Singh K N 2001 Comparative effectiveness of phosphate-enriched compost and single superphosphate on yield, uptake of nutrients and soil quality under soybean-wheat rotation. J. Agr. Sci. 137, 45–54.Google Scholar
  15. Musarrat J, Bano N and Rao R A K 2000 Isolation and characterization of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid-catabo-lizing bacteria and their biodegradation efficiency in soil. World J. Microbiol. Biotechnol. 16, 495–497.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. Pandey A and Palni L M S 1998 Isolation of Pseudomonas corrugate from Sikkim Himalaya. World J. Microbiol. Biotechnol. 14, 411–413.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. Pearson W R and Lipman D J 1988 Improved tools for biological sequence comparison. Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci. USA 85, 2444–2448.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  18. Peix A, Rivas-Boyero A A, Mateos P F, Rodríguez-Barrueco C, Martínez-Molina E and Velázquez E 2001a Growth promotion of chickpea and barley by a phosphate solubilizing strain of Mesorhizobium mediterraneum under growth chamber conditions. Soil Biol. Biochem. 33, 103–110.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  19. Peix A, Mateos P F, Rodríguez-Barrueco C, Martínez-Molina E and Velázquez E 2001b Growth promotion of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) by a strain of Burkholderia cepacia under growth chamber conditions. Soil Biol. Biochem. 33, 1927–1935.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  20. Rivas R, Velázquez E, Palomo J L, Mateos P, García-Benavides P and Martínez-Molina E 2002a Rapid identification of Clavibacter michiganensis subspecies sepedonicus using two primers random amplified polymorphic DNA (TP-RAPD) fingerprints. Eur. J. Plant Pathol. 108, 179–184.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  21. Rodríguez H and Fraga R 1999 Phosphate solubilizing bacteria and their role in plant growth promotion. Biotech. Adv. 17, 319–339.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  22. Saitou N and Nei M 1987 A neighbour-joining method: a new method for reconstructing phylogenetics trees. Mol. Biol. Evol. 44, 406–425.Google Scholar
  23. Singh S and Kapoor K K 1994 Solubilization of insoluble phosphates by bacteria isolated from different sources. Environ. Ecol. 12, 51–55.Google Scholar
  24. Singh S and Kapoor K K 1999 Inoculation with phosphate solubilizing microorganisms and a vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus improves dry matter yield and nutrient uptake by wheat grown in a sandy soil. Biol. Fertil. Soils 28, 139–144.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  25. Soil Conservation Service 1972 Soil Survey Laboratory Methods and Procedures for Collecting Soil Samples. U.S.D.A, Washington.Google Scholar
  26. Soil Survey Staff 1994 Keys to Soil Taxonomy, 6th edition, Soil Conservation service, USA.Google Scholar
  27. Thomas G V and Shantaram M V 1986 Solubilization of inorganic phosphates for bacteria from coconut plantation soils. J. Plantation Crops 14, 42–48.Google Scholar
  28. Thompson J D, Gibson T J, Plewniak F, Jeanmougin F and Higgins D G 1997 The clustalX windows interface: flexible strategies for multiple sequence alignment aided by quality analysis tools. Nucleic Acid Res. 24, 4876–4882.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  29. Vázquez P, Holguin G, Puente M E, López-Cortez A and Bashan Y 2000 Phosphate solubilizing microorganisms associted with the rhizosphere of mangroves in a semiarid associated with the rhizosphere of mangroves in a semiarid coastal lagoon. Biol. Fertil. Soils 30, 460–468.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  30. Villegas J and Fortín J A 2002 Phosphorous solubilization and pH changes as a result of the interactions between soil bacteria and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi on a medium containing NO3 as nitrogen source. Can. J. Bot. 80, 571–576.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  31. Viveganandan G and Jaurhi K S 2000 Growth and survival of phosphate-solubilizing bacteria in calcium alginate. Microbiol. Res. 155, 205–207.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  32. Yabuuchi E, Kosako Y, Oyaizu H, Yano I, Hotta H, Hashimoto Y, Ezaki T and Arakawa M 1992 Proposal of Burkholderia gen. nov. and transfer of seven species of genus Pseudomonas homology group II to the new genus, with the type species Burkholderia cepacia (Palleroni and Holmes 1981) comb. nov. Microbiol. Inmunol. 39, 897–904.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • L. Martín
    • 1
  • E. Velázquez
    • 1
  • R. Rivas
    • 1
  • P.F. Mateos
    • 1
  • E. Martínez-Molina
    • 1
  • C. Rodríguez-Barrueco
    • 2
  • A. Peix
    • 2
  1. 1.Departamento de Microbiología y Genética, Facultad de Farmacia, Edificio DepartamentalUniversidad de SalamancaSalamancaSpain
  2. 2.Departamento de Producción VegetalInstituto de Recursos Natu-rales y Agrobiología (IRNA. CSIC)SalamancaSpain

Personalised recommendations