Ecological Input-Output Analysis of Material Flows in Industrial Systems

  • Reid Bailey
Part of the Eco-Efficiency in Industry and Science book series (ECOE, volume 23)

Ecologists have used input-output analysis since the early 1970s to study flows of materials and energy in complex networks. These ecological networks are very similar to material and energy flows in industrial systems, yet the input-output approach developed by ecologists has not been applied to industrial systems. In this paper, an overview of early work to adapt ecological input-output analysis to industrial systems is presented.

Keywords

Nylon Nite Allo 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Reid Bailey
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Systems and Information EngineeringUniversity of VirginiaCharlottesvilleUSA

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