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Keywords

Professional Development Vocational Education Teacher Training Technical Education Vocational Qualification 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Springer 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Norman Lucas

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