Isolation of pollutant (pine needle ash)-responding genes from tissues of the seaweed Ulva pertusa

  • Se-Eun Kang
  • Long-Guo Jin
  • Jae-Suk Choi
  • Ji-Young Cho
  • Hyun-Woung Shin
  • Yong-Ki Hong
Conference paper
Part of the Developments in Applied Phycology book series (DAPH, volume 1)

Abstract

Genetic responses of the seaweed Ulva pertusa to pine needle ash have been compared using differential display technique. The tissue viability was assessed to evaluate the stress level with triphenyltetrazolium chloride. Total RNA, from tissues treated in seawater containing ash, was reverse transcribed and amplified by PCR with arbitrary primers. The genetic fragments responding to the stress were selectively isolated from agarose gel and sequenced with a DNA auto sequencer. According to sequence analysis, an ash-inducible gene (342 bp) and an ash-suppressed gene (1690 bp) were identified as hypothetical proteins.

Key words

ash differential display pine needle Ulva pertusa seaweed 

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Copyright information

© Springer 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • Se-Eun Kang
    • 1
  • Long-Guo Jin
    • 1
  • Jae-Suk Choi
    • 1
  • Ji-Young Cho
    • 1
  • Hyun-Woung Shin
    • 2
  • Yong-Ki Hong
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of BiotechnologyPukyong National UniversityNamku, BusanKorea
  2. 2.Department of Marine BiotechnologySoonchunhyang UniversityAsanKorea

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