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Linguistic Unity and Cultural Diversity in Europe: Implications for Research on English Language and Learning

  • Eva Alcón Soler

Keywords

Native Speaker Language Learning Minority Language Communicative Competence Apply Linguistics 
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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Eva Alcón Soler
    • 1
  1. 1.Universitat Jaume ISpain

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