The Presentation and Practice of the Communicative Act of Requesting in Textbooks: Focusing on Modifiers

  • Esther Usó-Juan

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Esther Usó-Juan
    • 1
  1. 1.Universitat Jaume ISpain

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