BEYOND PILOT PROJECTS: THE FEASIBILITY OF IMMEDIATE TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER FROM TRIED AND TESTED MARITIME AND OFFSHORE REVERSE OSMOSIS SYSTEMS TO STATIONARY SOLAR AND WIND POWERED DESALINATION SOLUTIONS

  • STEFAN THIESEN
Conference paper
Part of the NATO Security through Science Series book series

Abstract

Recent years have seen a large number of newly developed pilot projects for solar desalination based upon a variety of technological approaches. This paper explores the possibility of moving into direct installation and practical application of small to medium sized off-grid hybrid (solar, wind) powered Reverse Osmosis desalination systems using commercially available energy optimized equipment from the maritime, yachting and off-shore sectors. The focus is on exploring the feasibility of implementing this technology for remote applications in rural settings of developing countries. Various systems including an actual application are presented, as well as energy options and operational problems described, keeping appropriate technology requirements in mind. Some economic considerations are included.

Keywords

Wind Turbine Reverse Osmosis Rural Electrification Battery Bank Desalination System 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • STEFAN THIESEN
    • 1
  1. 1.MindQuest ConsultingSelmGermany

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