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VET in the Baltic States: Analysis of Commonalities and Differences of Reforms in Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania

  • Frank Bünning
  • Berit Graubner

The development of vocational education and training (VET) is a major concern of the Lisbon strategy for the prosperity of Europe in the twenty-first century. As the Baltic States have been one of the focuses of attention for European VET policy after their application for accession to the European Union, reforms in VET have enjoyed special attention there.

Keywords

European Union Gross Domestic Product Vocational Education Lifelong Learning Adult Education 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Frank Bünning
    • 1
  • Berit Graubner
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Vocational Education and Human Resources DevelopmentOtto von Guericke UniversityMagdeburgGermany
  2. 2.Freelance Slavist and AnglicistStuttgartGermany

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