Diverse Approaches to the Recognition of Competencies

  • Danielle Colardyn

The knowledge society and the information age have far-reaching implications for what individuals need to know and are able to do; where, when and how they learn; and the role of technical and vocational education and training (TVET) in these processes. Qualification requirements are changing as the cognitive dimensions of work rapidly supersede physical or manual activities in importance. Because of the rapid pace of change, traditional vocational and technical qualifications acquired at secondary and tertiary levels of education no longer provide ‘once-and-for-all’ preparation for working life. Workers need to update and upgrade their initial qualifications regularly and frequently in order to stay employable. Moreover, birth rates have declined in many countries, such that the renewal of labour-force qualifications is achieved less through the entry of young workers and hinges increasingly on modernizing and enhancing the qualifications of those who are already adults.

Keywords

Europe Coherence Assure Stake Ambi 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Danielle Colardyn
    • 1
  1. 1.International Expert on Comparative Education and Training PoliciesParisFrance

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