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Madrasah and Muslim Education: Its Interface with Urbanization

  • Sa'eda Buang
Part of the Springer International Handbooks of Education book series (SIHE, volume 19)

Madrasah, a Muslim religious school, and pesantren, loosely defined as a Muslim boarding school, are amongst the many Muslim educational institutions that still exist today amidst the tides of challenges brought about by urbanization. In contrast, pondok, another informal religious boarding school, and Imam-Khatib (Teacher-Student) schools in Turkey, are experiencing a near demise (Hasan Langgulung & Che Noraini Hashim, 2005) or political obliteration (Soon-Yong Pak, 2004), respectively. Such differing positioning of Muslim educational institutions has been attributed to the interface with and impact of urbanization, amongst other key socio-politico-economic factors. In other words, urbanization has been perceived as a contributing factor to the decline of Muslim educational institutions, including the madrasah, and Muslim education in general. Yet, arguably, urbanization has accelerated the process of madrasah’s curriculum reformation, and strengthened madrasah’s position as the focal point of Muslim individuals’ quests for their personal equilibrium. Such complex interface between madrasah and urbanization, and its seemingly imponderable ironies will be the focus of this chapter. In a nutshell, this chapter proposes to review the challenges of madrasah and Muslim education in and around the process of urbanization and its responses and strategies in mitigating the impact of the interface. These strategies, such as the Islamization of knowledge, curriculum reformation, and the promotion of Muslim education for human and social capitals, in turn, will be critically analyzed. Case studies of Malaysia, Indonesia, Pakistan, and Turkey will be surveyed from its comparative socio-historical analysis rather than chronological perspective, to give an overview of the madrasah and Muslim educational system in those countries.

Keywords

Religious Education Arabic Language Islamic Banking Muslim Country Muslim World 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sa'eda Buang
    • 1
  1. 1.Nanyang Technological UniversitySingapore

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