TRENDS AND ISSUES IN DEREGULATION AND DECENTRALIZATION OF EDUCATIONAL ADMINISTRATION IN JAPAN

  • Hiromitsu Muta
Part of the EDUCATION IN THE ASIA-PACIFIC REGION: ISSUES, CONCERNS AND PROSPECTS book series (EDAP, volume 8)

Abstract

In the late 19th century, Japan centralized its institutions, including education, in attempt to catch up with the Western industrialized nations. However, in order to maintain its competitive edge as a world leader in the economic globalization process, a century later the national leadership instituted a series of reforms designed to deregulate and decentralize the educational system. The objective was to provide sufficient flexibility and local control at the school level so that creativity, individual initiative, and the spirit of entrepreneurship would become part of the teaching learning process for each new generation of Japanese students.

Keywords

Transportation Assure Tral Univer Trial Basis 

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© Springer 2006

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  • Hiromitsu Muta

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