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Regional Conditions

  • Yoshiki Saito
  • Porfirio M. Alino
Chapter
Part of the Coastal Systems and Continental Margins book series (CSCM, volume 11)

In this chapter, we will see the geographic and societal situation of the coast and its management on a sub-regional basis. The subregion introduced first is East Asia, for which we will see China, Korea, Taiwan, and Japan. Coastal zones of East Asia are characterized by diversity of coastal morphology and strong oceanic and climatic activities. They have long suffered from natural hazards such as typhoons, storm surges, high waves, and tsunamis, resulting in huge damage to the human society. At the same time, concentration of large populations, economic activities, and development in the coastal zones are another feature in this region. Recent enormous economic development in the countries has accelerated the pressure to the region’s coastal environment together with global environmental changes such as sea-level rise and climate change. Therefore, the region has a strong need to develop a management framework for the coastal zones and its implementation. In this section, we will see the preset status of such efforts in this subregion.

Keywords

Coral Reef Tropical Cyclone Coastal Zone Storm Surge Tidal Flat 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Springer Science + Business Media B.V 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Yoshiki Saito
  • Porfirio M. Alino

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