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Policy for Conservation and Sustainable Development of the Coastal Zone

  • Nobuo Mimura
  • Asami Shikida
  • Masahiro Yamao
Chapter
Part of the Coastal Systems and Continental Margins book series (CSCM, volume 11)

Since the 1970s all countries have faced serious marine and coastal pollution, and have been forced to resolve these problems. For instance, Japan has long suffered from frequent occurrences of “Red Tide” in semi-enclosed bays and inland seas. This is symbolic of widespread marine pollution. On the other hand, the USA was challenged by diminishing and degradation of coastal wetlands, and the decline of fishery resources. In parallel with these local problems, global environmental issues have emerged since the late 1980s, including global warming, ozone layer depletion and marine pollution.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science + Business Media B.V 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Nobuo Mimura
    • 1
  • Asami Shikida
  • Masahiro Yamao
  1. 1.Institute for Global Change Adaptation ScienceIbaraki UniversityIbaraki PrefectureJapan

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