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Housing And Welfare

  • Irene Rochlitz
Part of the Animal Welfare book series (AWNS, volume 3)

Keywords

Animal Welfare Environmental Enrichment Road Traffic Accident Veterinary Practice Animal Shelter 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Irene Rochlitz
    • 1
  1. 1.Animal Welfare and Human-animal Interactions Group, Department of Veterinary MedicineUniversity of CambridgeUK

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