Moving into Dance: Dance Appreciation as Dance Literacy

  • Ann Dils
Part of the Springer International Handbook of Research in Arts Education book series (SIHE, volume 16)

Keywords

Migration Mold Posit Tempo Editing 

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ann Dils
    • 1
  1. 1.University of North CarolinaGreensboroU.S.A.

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