Evaluation Research in Visual Arts Education

  • Folkert Haanstra
  • Diederik W. Schönau
Part of the Springer International Handbook of Research in Arts Education book series (SIHE, volume 16)

Keywords

Europe Sorting Kelly Stake 

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Assessment and Professional Development

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  4. Schön, D. A. (1987). Educating the reflective practitioner: Toward a new design for teaching and learning in the professions. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.Google Scholar
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Copyright information

© Springer 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Folkert Haanstra
    • 1
  • Diederik W. Schönau
    • 2
  1. 1.Amsterdam School of the ArtsThe Netherlands
  2. 2.Dutch National Institute for Educational Measurement-CITOThe Netherlands

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