Quality of Life in a Divided Society

  • Valerie Møller
Part of the Social Indicators Research Series book series (SINS, volume 24)

Abstract

Quality-of-life studies of the ‘counting’ variety were launched in America and Europe in the 1960s. Since then it is primarily research based on populations in developed countries that has informed our knowledge of quality-of-life measurement and substantive issues pertaining to life quality. In the first section, the paper states that developing country studies are increasingly finding space in leading scientific quality-oflife journals and thereby afford opportunities to expand the global knowledge base. The paper then focuses on quality-of-life studies in divided societies, taking South Africa as example of a deeply divided society — ethnically and socio-economically. It is argued that disaggregation of social indicators along the fault lines in society leads to a deeper understanding of the complexities in the social fabric which are masked by country-level statistics.

Keywords

Europe Income Dispatch Ambi 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Afrobarometer (2002): Afrobarometer Briefing Paper No. 1 (www.afrobarometer.org).Google Scholar
  2. Cummins, R. A. (2000): Personal Income and Subjective Well-being: A Review. Journal of Happiness Studies 1, 133–58.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Devey, R. & V. Moller (2002): Closing the Gap between Rich and Poor in South Africa: Trends in Objective and Subjective Indicators of Quality of Life in the October Household Survey. W. Glatzer (ed.): Rich and Poor: Disparities, Perceptions, Concomitants, Dordrecht: Kluwer Academic Publishers, 105–22.Google Scholar
  4. Dickow, H. & V. Moller (2002): South Africa’s “Rainbow People”, National Pride and Optimism: A Trend Study. Social Indicators Research 59 (2), 175–202.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Diener, E. & R. Biswas-Diener (2002): Will Money Increase Subjective Well-being? A Literature Review and Guide to Needed Research. Social Indicators Research 57, 119–69.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Diener, E. & C. Diener (1995): The Wealth of Nations Revisited. Social Indicators Research 36, 275–86.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Diener, E., E. Sandvik, L. Seidlitz, & M. Diener (1993): The Relationship between Income and Subjective Well-being: Relative or Absolute? Social Indicators Research 28, 195–223.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. Diener, E. & S. Oishi (2000): Money and Happiness: Income and Subjective Well-being across Nations. E. Diener & E. M. Suh (eds.): Culture and Subjective Well-being, Cambridge, Mass.: Mit Press, 185–218.Google Scholar
  9. Easterlin, R. A. (1974): Does Economic Growth Improve the Human Lot? P. A. David & M. W. Reder (eds.): Nations and Households in Economic Growth. Essays in Honor of Moses Abramovitz, New York: Academic Press, 89–125.Google Scholar
  10. Easterlin, R. A. (1995): Will Raising the Incomes of All Increase the Happiness of All? Journal of Economic Behavior and Organization 27, 35–47.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. Easterlin, R. A. (2002): The Income-Happiness Relationship. W. Glatzer (ed.): Rich and Poor: Disparities, Perceptions, Concomitants, Dordrecht: Kluwer Academic Publishers, 157–75.Google Scholar
  12. Ferris, A. (2002): World Development Indicators 2002: Poverty is the Enemy. Social Indicators Network News (Sinet) 73, 6–7.Google Scholar
  13. Fielding, R. (2003): Response to Editorial — Qolnl 28: The Value of Quality of Life Research — Two. Mapi Research Institute Quality of Life Newsletter 30, 22.Google Scholar
  14. Francis, S. & R. Schachterl (2002): Madam and Eve: Ten Wonderful Years, Johannesburg: Rapid Phase.Google Scholar
  15. Frey, B. S. & A. Stutzer (2000): Happiness Prospers in Democracy. Journal of Happiness Studies 1 (1), 79–102.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. Glatzer, W. (ed.) (2002): Rich and Poor: Disparities, Perceptions, Concomitants, Dordrecht: Kluwer Academic Publishers.Google Scholar
  17. Hanf, T. (1999): The Sacred Marker: Religion, Communalism, and Nationalism. Th. Hanf (ed.): Dealing with Difference. Religion, Ethnicity and Politics: Comparing Cases and Concepts, Baden-Baden: Nomos, 385–95.Google Scholar
  18. Huntington, S. P. (1998): The Clash of Civilizations and the Remaking of World Order, New York: Touchstone Books.Google Scholar
  19. Inglehart, R. & H.-D. Klingemann (2000): Genes, Culture, Democracy and Happiness. E. Diener & E. M. Suh (eds.): Culture and Subjective Well-being, Cambridge, Mass.: Mit Press, 165–183.Google Scholar
  20. Johnson, P. (1996): Modern Times: A History of the World from the 1920s to the 1990s, London: Phoenix, Orion Books.Google Scholar
  21. Joyce, D. (2002): The Value of Quality of Life Research — Two. Mapi Research Institute Quality of Life Newsletter 28, 1.Google Scholar
  22. Kernig, C. D. (1999): Violence, Conscience and Elites: Fundamentalism and Feminism as Signs of Cultural Crisis. T. Hanf (ed.): Dealing with Difference. Religion, Ethnicity and Politics: Comparing Cases and Concepts, Baden-Baden: Nomos, 8–53.Google Scholar
  23. Kitayama, S. & H. R. Markus (2000): The Pursuit of Happiness and the Realization of Sympathy: Cultural Patterns of Self, Social Relations, and Well-being. E. Diener & E. M. Suh (eds.): Culture and Subjective Well-being, Cambridge, Mass.: Mit Press, 113–61.Google Scholar
  24. Knox, P. L. (1974): Social Well-being: A Spatial Perspective, London: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  25. Michalos, A. C. (1985): Multiple Discrepancies Theory (Mtd). Social Indicators Research 16, 347–413.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  26. Michalos, A. C. (1991): Global Report on Student Well-being. Volume 1: Life Satisfaction and Happiness, New York: Springer.Google Scholar
  27. Møller, V. (1993): Quality of Life in Unemployment, Pretoria: Human Sciences Research Council Publishers.Google Scholar
  28. Moller, V. (ed.) (1997): Quality of Life in South Africa, Dordrecht: Kluwer Academic Publishers.Google Scholar
  29. Moller, V. (1998): Quality of Life in South Africa: Post-apartheid Trends. Social Indicators Research 43, 27–68.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  30. Moller, V. (1999a): Happiness and the Ethnic Marker: The South African Case. T. Hanf (ed.): Dealing with Difference. Religion, Ethnicity and Politics: Comparing Cases and Concepts, Baden-Baden: Nomos, 283–303.Google Scholar
  31. Moller, V. (1999b): South African Quality of Life Trends in the Late 1990s: Major Divides in Perceptions. Society in Transition 30 (2), 93–105.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  32. Moller, V. (2000): Monitoring Quality of Life in Durban, South Africa. F. T. Seik, L. L. Yuan & G. W. K. Mie (eds.): Planning for a Better Quality of Life in Cities, Singapore: School of Building and Real Estate, National University of Singapore, 313–29.Google Scholar
  33. Moller, V. (2001): Happiness Trends under Democracy: Where Will the New South African Set-level Come to Rest? Journal of Happiness Studies 2, 33–53.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  34. Moller, V. & H. Dickow (2002): The Role of Quality of Life Surveys in Managing Change in Democratic Transitions: The South African Case. Social Indicators Research 58 (1–3), 267–92.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  35. Moller, V. & M. Ferreira (2003): Just Getting By, Cape Town: Walter and Albertina Sisulu Institute for Ageing in Africa, University of Cape Town.Google Scholar
  36. Moller, V. & L. Schlemmer (1983): Quality of Life in South Africa: Towards an Instrument for the Assessment of Quality of Life and Basic Needs. Social Indicators Research 12, 279–91.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  37. Saris, W. E. & A. Andreenkova (eds.) (2001): Happiness in Russia. Journal of Happiness Studies 2 (2), 95–109.Google Scholar
  38. Sapa (2003): Youth Confident in Sa Future. Daily Dispatch, East London, June 12, 1.Google Scholar
  39. Schlemmer, L. (2001): Race Relations and Racism in Everyday Life. South African Institute of Race Relations Fast Facts, Johannesburg, 9, 2–12.Google Scholar
  40. Schyns, P. (2001): Income and Satisfaction in Russia. Journal of Happiness Research 2 (2), 173–204.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  41. Sen, A. K. (1999): Development as Freedom, Oxford: Clarendon Press.Google Scholar
  42. Shisana, O. & L. Simbayi (2002): Nelson Mandela/Hsrc Study of Hiv/Aids 2002: South African National Hiv Prevalence, Behavioural Risks and Mass Media, Household Survey 2002, Cape Town: Human Sciences Research Council Publishers.Google Scholar
  43. South African Institute of Race Relations (Sairr) (2002): Crime Watch, Fast Facts No. 10, October.Google Scholar
  44. South African Institute of Race Relations (Sairr) (2003): Fast Facts No. 7, July.Google Scholar
  45. Triandis, H. C. (2000): Cultural Syndromes and Subjective Well-being. E. Diener & E. M. Suh (eds.): Culture and Subjective Well-being, Cambridge, Mass: Mit Press, 13–36.Google Scholar
  46. United Nations Development Programme (1994): Human Development Report 1994, New York: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  47. Veenhoven, R. (2002): Why Social Policy Needs Subjective Indicators. M. R. Hagerty, J. Vogel & V. Moller (eds.): Assessing Quality of Life and Living Conditions to Guide National Policy: The State of the Art, Dordrecht: Kluwer Academic Publishers, 33–45.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  48. Vogel, J. (1997): The Future Direction of Social Indicators Research. Social Indicators Research 42, 10316.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • Valerie Møller
    • 1
  1. 1.Rhodes UniversityGrahamstownSouth Africa

Personalised recommendations