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Keywords

Natural Disaster United Nation Environment Disaster Preparedness Disaster Mitigation Earth Summit 
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9. References

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Copyright information

© Springer 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jacqueline Sims
    • 1
  1. 1.Office of Global and Integrated Environmental HealthWorld Health Organization

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