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WiseNET — An Ultralow-Power Solution for Wireless Sensor Networks

  • C. C. Enz
  • A. El-Hoiydi
  • J.-D. Decotignie
  • A.-S. Porret
  • T. Melly
  • V. Peiris

Abstract

WiseNET offers an ultralow-power platform for the implementation of wireless sensor networks. This low-power operation is achieved thanks to a careful co-design approach of a new medium access control (MAC) protocol called WiseMAC and a dedicated duty-cycled radio. WiseMAC is based on CSMA with an adaptive preamble sampling. It is particularly well suited to ad-hoc and hybrid infrastructure networks. The 1st-generation WiseNET transceiver allowed to demonstrate the feasibility of integrating ultralow-power transceivers in a standard digital CMOS process. It operates in the 434 MHz band and consumes only 1 mW from a 1 V supply, while achieving a —95 dBm sensitivity for a 24 kb/s data rate with a 10-3 BER. A 2nd-generation WiseNET transceiver was designed and specifically optimized for the new WiseMAC protocol. This new WiseNET radio offers dual-band operation, runs from a single 1.5 V battery and operates downto 0.9 V while consuming only 1.8 mW in receive mode. It achieves a —104 dBm sensitivity for 25 kb/s data rate with a 10-3 BER. In addition to this low-power radio, the WiseNET system-onchip (SoC) also includes all the functions required for data acquisition, processing and storage of the information provided by the sensor. The WiseNET solution consumes about 100 times less power than comparable solutions available today

Keywords

Power Consumption Sensor Node Wireless Sensor Network Voltage Control Oscillator Frequency Synthesizer 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • C. C. Enz
    • 1
    • 2
  • A. El-Hoiydi
    • 1
  • J.-D. Decotignie
    • 1
    • 2
  • A.-S. Porret
    • 3
  • T. Melly
    • 1
  • V. Peiris
    • 1
  1. 1.Swiss Center for Electronics and Microtechnology (CSEM)NeuchâtelSwitzerland
  2. 2.Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (EPFL)LausanneSwitzerland
  3. 3.Xceive Corp.Santa ClaraUSA

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