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Implications on Ecosystems in Bangladesh

  • Ansarul Karim
Part of the Water Science and Technology Library book series (WSTL, volume 49)

Abstract

Rivers and streams with their associated flood basins and upland areas form complexly linked ecosystems in which land, water, plants, animals and humans interact and evolve in response to the interactions of the components of the system. Thus changes in any component of the system will impact the physical, chemical, and biological process occurring within the river system. River systems normally function within the natural ranges of flow, sediment movement, temperature and other variables, in what is termed “dynamic equilibrium.” When changes in these variables go beyond their natural ranges, dynamic equilibrium may be lost, often resulting in adjustments that are detrimental to the integrity of the ecosystem, which includes ecosystem structure, ecological process, regional and historical context, and sustainable cultural practices.

Keywords

Mangrove Ecosystem Freshwater Flow Mangrove Plant Wood Volume Crown Damage 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ansarul Karim
    • 1
  1. 1.ECOMACDhanmomdi, DhakaBangladesh

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