Skip to main content

The welfare of laboratory guinea pigs

  • Chapter

Part of the Animal Welfare book series (AWNS,volume 2)

Keywords

  • Cavia Porcellus
  • Bonding Partner
  • Pygmy Rabbit
  • Wild Cavy
  • High Population Number

These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

This is a preview of subscription content, access via your institution.

Buying options

Chapter
USD   29.95
Price excludes VAT (USA)
  • DOI: 10.1007/978-1-4020-2271-5_9
  • Chapter length: 29 pages
  • Instant PDF download
  • Readable on all devices
  • Own it forever
  • Exclusive offer for individuals only
  • Tax calculation will be finalised during checkout
eBook
USD   109.00
Price excludes VAT (USA)
  • ISBN: 978-1-4020-2271-5
  • Instant PDF download
  • Readable on all devices
  • Own it forever
  • Exclusive offer for individuals only
  • Tax calculation will be finalised during checkout
Softcover Book
USD   149.99
Price excludes VAT (USA)
Hardcover Book
USD   219.99
Price excludes VAT (USA)

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  • Asher M, Sachser N. Social system and spatial organization of wild guinea pigs /cavia aperea) in a natural low density population. J Mammal in press

    Google Scholar 

  • Beauchamp GK. Attraction of male guinea pigs to conspecific urine. Physiol Behav 1973; 10:589-594

    CrossRef  CAS  PubMed  Google Scholar 

  • Beauchamp GK, Criss BR, Wellington JL. Chemical communication in Cavia: responses of wild (C. aperea), domestic (C. procellus) and F1 males to urine. Anim Behav 1979; 27:1066-1072

    CrossRef  CAS  PubMed  Google Scholar 

  • Beauchamp GK, Wellington JL, Wysocki CJ, Brand JG, Kubie JL, Smith AB. Chemical communication in the guinea pig: urinary components of low volatibility and their access to the vomeronasal organ. In Chemical Signals: Vertebrates and Aaquatic Invertebrates. Müller-Schwarze D, Silverstein R eds, Plenum Press, New York 1980; 327-339

    Google Scholar 

  • Beauchamp GK, Martin IG, Wysocki CJ, Wellington JL. Chemoinvestigatory and sexual behaviour of male guinea pigs following vomeronasal organ removal. Physiol Behav 1982; 29:329-336

    CrossRef  CAS  PubMed  Google Scholar 

  • Beer R, Sachser N. Sozialstruktur und Wohlergehen in Männchengruppen des Hausmeer-schweinchens. In Aktuelle Arbeiten zur artgemäßen Tierhaltung 1991, KTBL-Schrift 351, Darmstadt 1992; 158-167

    Google Scholar 

  • Benecke N. Der Mensch und seine Haustiere. Konrad Theiss Verlag GmbH & Co, Stuttgard 1994

    Google Scholar 

  • Berryman JC. Social behaviour in a colony of domestic guinea pigs. Z Tierpsychol 1978; 46:200-214

    Google Scholar 

  • Berryman JC, Fullerton C. A developmental study of interactions between young and adult guinea pigs. Behaviour 1976; 59:22-39

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Bilsing A, Schneider R, Astrath S. Sozialverhalten von Hausmeerschweinchen Cavia aperea f. porcellus in Abhängigkeit von sozialen Erfahrungen. Zoologische Jahrbücher (Physiologie) 1987; 91:113-120

    Google Scholar 

  • Birke LIA. Some behavioral changes associated with the guinea-pig oestrus cycle. Z Tierpsychol 1981; 55:79-89

    CAS  PubMed  Google Scholar 

  • Bowlby J. Attachment. Penguin, Middlesex, England 1972

    Google Scholar 

  • Broom DM, Johnson KG. Stress and Animal Welfare. Chapman and Hall, London 1993

    Google Scholar 

  • Cassini MH. Foraging under predation risk in the wild guinea pig Cavia aperea. Oikos 1991; 62:20-24

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Cassini MH, Galante L. Foraging under predation risk in the wild guinea pig: the effect of vegetation height on habitat utilization. Ann Zool Fenn 1992; 29:285-290

    Google Scholar 

  • Christian JJ. Hormonal control of population growth. In Hormonal Correlates of Behavior vol. 1. Eleftheriou, BE, Sprott RLS eds, Plenum Press, New York 1975; 205-274

    Google Scholar 

  • Clutton-Brock J. A Natural History of Domesticated Mammals. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge 1989

    Google Scholar 

  • Council of Europe. European Convention for the Protection of Vertebrate Animals used for Experimental and other Scientific Purposes (ETS 123). Council of Europe, Strasbourg 1986

    Google Scholar 

  • Darwin C. On the Origin of Species by Means of Natural Selection. John Murray, London 1859

    Google Scholar 

  • Darwin C. The Variation of Animals and Plants under Domestication. John Murray, London 1868

    Google Scholar 

  • Eisenberg JF. Mammals of the Neotropics. Volume 1: the Northern Neotropics. University of Chicago Press, Chicago 1989

    Google Scholar 

  • Fox MW. Effects of domestication in animals: A review. In The Dog: Its Domestication and Behaviour. Fox MW ed, Garland STPM Press, New York, London 1978; 3-19

    Google Scholar 

  • Fujieda K, Goff AK, Pugeat M, Strott CA. Regulation of the pituitary-adrenal axis and corti-costeroid-binding globulin-cortisol interaction in the guinea pig. Endocrinology 1982; 111:1944-1949

    CrossRef  CAS  PubMed  Google Scholar 

  • Gade DW. The guinea pig in andean folk culture. Geogr Rev 1967; 57:213-224

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Guichón ML, Cassini MH. Role of diet selection in the use of habitat by pampas cavies Cavia aperea pamparum (Mammalia, Rodentia). Mammalia 1998; 62:23-35

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Haase E, Donham RS. Hormones and domestication. In Avian Endocrinology. Epple A, Stetson MH eds, Academic Press, New York 1980; 549-565

    Google Scholar 

  • Hale EB. Domestication and the evolution of behaviour. In Behaviour of Domestic Animals, 2nd edition. Hafez ESE ed, Williams and Wilkings, Baltimore 1969; 22-42

    Google Scholar 

  • Harper LV. Behavior. In The Biology of the Guinea Pig. Wagner IE, Manning PJ eds, Aca-demic Press, New York, San Francisco, London 1976; 31-52

    Google Scholar 

  • Hennessy MB. Enduring maternal influences in a precocial rodent. Dev Psychobiol 2003; 42:225-236

    CrossRef  PubMed  Google Scholar 

  • Hennessy MB, Ritchey RL. Hormonal and behavioral attachment responses in infant guinea pigs. Dev Psychobiol 1987; 20:613-625

    CrossRef  CAS  PubMed  Google Scholar 

  • Henry JP, Stephens PM. Stress, Health and the Social Environment. A Sociobiological Ap-proach to Medicine. Springer, New York, Heidelberg, Berlin 1977

    Google Scholar 

  • Herre W, Röhrs M. Haustiere - zoologisch gesehen. Gustav Fischer Verlag, Stuttgart, New York 1990

    Google Scholar 

  • Hohoff C. Female choice in three species of wild guinea pigs. PhD thesis, University of Mün-ster, Germany 2002

    Google Scholar 

  • Hückinghaus F. Zur Nomenklatur und Abstammung des Hausmeerschweinchens. Z Säugetierkd 1961; 26:108-111

    Google Scholar 

  • Hyams E. Animals in the service of man: 10 000 years of domestication. J.M. Dent and Sons Ltd, London 1972

    Google Scholar 

  • Jacobs GH, Deegan JF. Spectral sensitivity, photopigments, and color vision in the guinea pig (Cavia porcellus). Behav Neurosci 1994; 108: 993-1004

    CrossRef  CAS  PubMed  Google Scholar 

  • Jacobs WW. Male-female associations in the domestic guinea pig. Anim Learn Behav 1976; 4:77-83

    CAS  PubMed  Google Scholar 

  • Jäckel M, Trillmich F. Olfactory individual recognition of mothers by young guinea-pigs (Cavia porcellus). Ethology 2003; 109:197-208

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Jones CT. Corticosteroid concentrations in the plasma of fetal and maternal guinea pigs dur-ing gestation. Endocrinology 1974; 95:1129-1133

    CrossRef  CAS  PubMed  Google Scholar 

  • Kaiser S, Sachser N. The social environment during pregnancy and lactation affects the fe-male offsprings’ endocrine status and behaviour in guinea pigs. Physiol Behav 1998; 63:361-366

    CrossRef  CAS  PubMed  Google Scholar 

  • Kaiser S, Sachser N. Social stress during pregnancy and lactation affects in guinea pigs the maleoffsprings’endocrinestatusandinfantilizestheirbehaviour. Psychoneuroendocrinology 2001; 26:503-519

    CrossRef  CAS  PubMed  Google Scholar 

  • Kaiser S, Kirtzeck M, Hornschuh G, Sachser N. Sex specific difference in social support - a study in female guinea pigs. Physiol Behav 2003a; 79:297-303

    CrossRef  CAS  PubMed  Google Scholar 

  • Kaiser S, Kruijver FPM, Swaab DF, Sachser N. Early social stress in female guinea pigs in-duces a masculinization of adult behavior and corresponding changes in brain and neuro-endocrine function. Behav Brain Res 2003b; 144:199-210

    CrossRef  CAS  PubMed  Google Scholar 

  • Kaiser S, Kruijver FPM, Straub RH, Sachser N, Swaab DF. Early social stress in male guinea pigs changes social behaviour, and autonomic and neuroendocrine functions. J Neuroendo-crinol 2003c; 15:761-769

    CAS  Google Scholar 

  • Kaiser S, Nübold T, Rohlmann I, Sachser N. Female, but not male guinea pigs adapt easily to a new social environment irrespective of their rearing conditions. Physiol Behav 2003d; 80:147-153

    CrossRef  CAS  PubMed  Google Scholar 

  • Kawachi I, Berkman LF. Social ties and mental health. J Urban Health 2001; 78:458-467

    CAS  PubMed  Google Scholar 

  • King JA. Social relations of the domestic guinea pig living under semi-natural conditions. Ecology 1956; 37:221-228

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Kunkel P, Kunkel, I. Beiträge zur Ethologie des Hausmeerschweinchens. Z Tierpsychol 1964; 21:602-641

    Google Scholar 

  • König B. Maternal activity budget during lactation in two species of Caviidae (Cavia porcellus and Galea musteloides). Z Tierpsychol 1985; 68:215-230

    Google Scholar 

  • Künzl C. Verhaltensbiologische Untersuchungen zur Domestikation des Meerschweinchens. PhD Thesis, University of Münster, Germany 2000

    Google Scholar 

  • Künzl C, Sachser N. The behavioural endocrinology of domestication: a comparison between the domestic guinea pig (Cavia aperea f. porcellus) and it´s wild ancestor the wild cavy (Cavia aperea). Horm Behav 1999; 35:28-37

    CrossRef  PubMed  Google Scholar 

  • Künzl C, Kaiser S, Meier E, Sachser N. Is a wild mammal kept and reared in captivity still a wild animal? Horm Behav 2003; 43:187-196

    CrossRef  PubMed  Google Scholar 

  • Levinson DM, Buchanan DR, Willis FN. Development of social behavior in the guinea pig in the absence of adult males. Psychol Rec 1979; 29:361-370

    Google Scholar 

  • Mares MA, Ojeda RA. Patterns of diversity and adaptation in South American hystricognath rodents. In Mammalian Biology in South America. Mares MA, Genoways HH eds, Pymatuning Laboratory of Ecology, Special Publications No. 6, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 1982; 393-432

    Google Scholar 

  • Martin IG, Beauchamp GK. Olfactory recognition of individuals by male cavies (Cavia aperea). J Chem Ecol 1982; 8:1241-1249

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Nachtsheim H, Stengel H. Vom Wildtier zum Haustier. Verlag Paul Parey, Berlin, Hamburg 1977

    Google Scholar 

  • Nehring A. Über die Herkunft des Hausmeerschweinchens. Sitzungsberichte der Gesellschaft naturforschender Freunde zu Berlin 1889; 1:1-4

    Google Scholar 

  • North D. The Guinea-pig. In The UFAW Handbook on the Care and Management of Labora-tory Animals, seventh edition, volume I Terrestrial Vertebrates. Poole T ed, Blackwell Science Ltd 1999; 367-388

    Google Scholar 

  • Pettijohn TF. Attachment and separation distress in the infant guinea pig. Dev Psychobiol 1979; 12:73-81

    CrossRef  CAS  PubMed  Google Scholar 

  • Pekow CA, Baumans V. Common nonsurgical techniques and procedures. In Handbook in Laboratory Animal Science, second edition, vol I Essential Principles and Practices. Hau J, Van Hoosier GL eds, CRC Press 2003; 351-390

    Google Scholar 

  • Price EO. Behavioral aspects of animal domestication. Q rev biol 1984; 59: 1-32

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Redford KH, Eisenberg JF. Mammals of the Neotropics, vol 2, the Southern Cone. University of Chicago Press, Chicago 1992

    Google Scholar 

  • Rood JP. Ecological and behavioural comparisons of three genera of Argentine cavies. Ani-mal Behaviour Monographs 1972; 5:1-83

    Google Scholar 

  • Sachser N. Different forms of social organization at high and low population densities in guinea pigs. Behaviour 1986; 97:253-272

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Sachser N. Short-term responses of plasma-norepinephrine, epinephrine, glucocorticoid and testosterone titers to social and non-social stressors in male guinea pigs of different social status. Physiol Behav 1987; 39:11-20

    CrossRef  CAS  PubMed  Google Scholar 

  • Sachser N. Social organization, social status, behavioural strategies and endocrine responses in male guinea pigs. In: Hormones, Brain and Behavior in Vertebrates. Balthazart J ed, Comparative Physiology, Karger, Basel 1990; 9:176-187

    Google Scholar 

  • Sachser N. The ability to arrange with conspecifics depends on social experiences around pu-berty. Physiol Behav 1993; 53:539-544

    CrossRef  CAS  PubMed  Google Scholar 

  • Sachser N. Sozialphysiologische Untersuchungen an Hausmeerschweinchen. Gruppenstruk-turen, soziale Situation und Endokrinium, Wohlergehen. Parey, Berlin 1994a

    Google Scholar 

  • Sachser N. Social stratification and health in non-human mammals - a case study in guinea pigs. In: Social Stratification and Socioeconomic Inequality. Ellis L ed, Praeger, Westport 1994b; 2:113-121.

    Google Scholar 

  • Sachser N. Of domestic and wild guinea pigs: studies in sociophysiology, domestication, and social evolution. Naturwissenschaften 1998a; 85:307-317

    CrossRef  CAS  PubMed  Google Scholar 

  • Sachser N. Was bringen Präferenztests? In: Aktuelle Arbeiten zur artgemäßen Tierhaltung 1997. KTBL Schrift 380, Darmstadt 1998b; 9-20

    Google Scholar 

  • Sachser N. What is important to achieve good welfare in animals? In Coping with Challenge: Wwelfare in Animals including Humans. Broom DM ed, Dahlem Workshop Report 87, Dahlem University Press, Berlin 2001; 31-48

    Google Scholar 

  • Sachser N, Hendrichs H. A longitudinal study on the social structure and its dynamics in a group of guinea pigs (Cavia aperea f. porcellus). Säugetierkundliche Mitteilungen 1982; 30:227-240

    Google Scholar 

  • Sachser N, Pröve E. Short-term effects of residence on the testosterone responses to fighting in alpha male guinea pigs. Aggress Behav 1984; 10:285-292

    CrossRef  CAS  Google Scholar 

  • Sachser N, Lick C. Social experience, behavior, and stress in guinea pigs. Physiol Behav 1991; 50:83-90

    CrossRef  CAS  PubMed  Google Scholar 

  • Sachser N, Lick C, Beer, R, Weinandy R. Tagesgang von Serum-Hormonkonzentrationen und ethologischen Parametern bei Hausmeerschweinchen. Verhandlungen der Deutschen Zoologischen Gesellschaft 1992; 85:120.

    Google Scholar 

  • Sachser N, Renninger S-V. Coping with new social situations: the role of social rearing in guinea pigs. Ethol Ecol Evol 1993; 5:65-74

    Google Scholar 

  • Sachser N, Lick C, Stanzel K. The environment, hormones, and aggressive behaviour: a 5-year-study in guinea pigs. Psychoneuroendocrinology 1994; 19:697-707

    CrossRef  CAS  PubMed  Google Scholar 

  • Sachser N, Kaiser S. Prenatal social stress masculinizes the females’ behaviour in guinea pigs. Physiol Behav 1996; 60:589-594

    CrossRef  CAS  PubMed  Google Scholar 

  • Sachser N, Dürschlag M, Hirzel D. Social relationships and the management of stress. Psychoneuroendocrinology 1998; 23:891-904

    CrossRef  CAS  PubMed  Google Scholar 

  • Sachser N, Schwarz-Weig E, Keil A, Epplen JT. Behavioural strategies, testis size, and repro-ductive success in two caviomorph rodents with different mating systems. Behaviour 1999; 136:1203-1217

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Stahnke A. Verhaltensunterschiede zwischen Wild- und Hausmeerschweinchen. Z Säugetierkd 1987; 52:294-307

    Google Scholar 

  • Stahnke A, Hendrichs H. Meerschweinchenverwandte Nagetiere. In Grzimeks Enzyklopädie Säugetiere. Grzimek B ed, Kindler Verlag, München 1988; 314-357

    Google Scholar 

  • Sutherland SD, Festing MFW. The guinea-pig. In The UFAW Handbook on the Care and Management of Laboratory Animals, Sixth Edition. Poole TB ed, Churchill Livingstone, New York 1987; 393-410

    Google Scholar 

  • Thyen Y, Hendrichs H. Differences in behaviour and social organization of female guinea pigs as a function of the presence of a male. Ethology 1990; 85:25-34

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Von Holst D. The concept of stress and its relevance for animal behavior. In Advances of the Study of Behavior. Lehman DS, Hinde R, Shaw E eds, Academic Press, London, New York 1998; 1-131

    Google Scholar 

  • Wagner JE. Introduction and taxonomy. In The Biology of the Guinea Pig. Wagner IE, Manning PJ eds, Academic Press, New York, San Francisco, London 1976; 1-4

    Google Scholar 

  • Weir BJ. Some notes on the history of the domestic guinea pig. Guinea pig newsletter 1972; 5:2-5

    Google Scholar 

  • Weir BJ. Notes on the origin of the domestic guinea-pig. Symposium of the Zoological Soci-ety of London 1974; 34:437-446

    Google Scholar 

  • Wewers D, Kaiser S, Sachser N. Maternal separation in guinea pigs: a study in behavioural biology. Ethology 2003; 109:443-453

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Wing ES. Animal domestication in the Andes. In: Origins of Agriculture. Reed CA ed, Paris: Mouton Publishers, The Hague 1977; 837-859

    Google Scholar 

Download references

Author information

Authors and Affiliations

Authors

Editor information

Editors and Affiliations

Rights and permissions

Reprints and Permissions

Copyright information

© 2007 Springer

About this chapter

Cite this chapter

Sachser, N., Künzl, C., Kaiser, S. (2007). The welfare of laboratory guinea pigs. In: Kaliste, E. (eds) The Welfare of Laboratory Animals. Animal Welfare, vol 2. Springer, Dordrecht. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4020-2271-5_9

Download citation