Causal Mechanisms and the Study of International Environmental Regimes

  • Jon Hovi
Chapter

Abstract

Over the past two decades or so, the idea of causal “mechanisms” has become extremely widespread in both the philosophy of the social sciences and in applied social science. Recently, it has also turned up in the literature on international environmental regimes. A common motivation for invoking the concept seems to be a desire to open up the black box between a cause and its effect, that is, to analyze in detail exactly how the cause relates to the effect. On closer inspection, however, it turns out that those using the term have a number of different things in mind. This leaves a somewhat confusing picture of what a causal mechanism is and what it means for explanation in the social sciences.

Keywords

Boulder Defend Concession 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jon Hovi
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Political ScienceUniversity of Oslo, and CICERONorway

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