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Handling Uncertainty in Artificial Intelligence, and the Bayesian Controversy

  • Donald Gillies
Part of the Vienna Circle Institute Yearbook book series (VCIY, volume 11)

Abstract

This paper is divided into two parts. In the first part (sections 2 and 3), I will describe briefly how advances in artificial intelligence (AI) in the 1970s led to the crucial problem of handling uncertainty, and how attempts to solve this problem led in turn to the emergence of the new theory of Bayesian networks. I will try to focus in this historical account on the key ideas and will not give a full account of the technical details. Then, in the second part (section 4), I will consider the implications of these new results for the long-standing controversy between Bayesians and non-Bayesians.

Keywords

Expert System Bayesian Network Subjective Probability Conditional Independence Acute Abdominal Pain 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2004

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  • Donald Gillies

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