Measurement of Symptom Severity and Impairment

  • Lawrence J. Lewandowski
  • Benjamin J. Lovett
  • Michael Gordon
Chapter

Abstract

Brenda, a fifth grader with a measured IQ in the gifted range (135), has reading skills that are only slightly above average (a standard score of 108). There is a significant discrepancy between her ability and her level of achievement. Does this mean that Brenda has a learning disability in the area of reading? Is a score of 108 a deficit in relation to most people? The reading score may be a relative weakness, but does Brenda need special education services and test accommodations?

Keywords

Depression Schizophrenia 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Lawrence J. Lewandowski
    • 1
  • Benjamin J. Lovett
    • 2
  • Michael Gordon
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of PsychologySyracuse UniversitySyracuseUSA
  2. 2.Department of PsychologyElmira CollegeElmiraUSA
  3. 3.Department of PsychiatrySUNY Health Science CenterSyracuseUSA

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