Advertisement

Row Crops Grown as Annuals or Biennials

  • R. J. Stephens
Chapter

Abstract

All the major food crops of the world as well as cotton and tobacco are grown as row crops. Most are planted as seeds although some are planted from stem tubers or other vegetative propagules. Young plants emerging from the soil soon face competition from weeds unless countermeasures are taken. Vegetatively propagated row crops, such as yams and potatoes, have an initial size advantage over most weeds, but their relatively slow emergence allows time for weeds to achieve a dominance over the crop. Thus effective control of weeds in row crops is essential if their yield potential is to be realised, and it is this group of plants that, worldwide, makes the greatest demands on human labour. The successful use of herbicides in row crops over recent years has been largely responsible for the changes in crop management (Chapter 8) and in the whole economic and social structure of farming that have occurred in Europe and other ‘developed’ areas.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. BLEASDALE, J. K. A. (1963). Crop spacing and management under weed-free conditions, in Crop Production in a Weed-free Environment, 2nd Symposium of the British Weed Protection Council, Blackwell, Oxford, p. 114Google Scholar
  2. CURRAH, I. E. (1978). Fluid drilling, World Crops, 30 (1), 22–24Google Scholar
  3. HAWTREE, J. N. (1980). Weeds and cotton, Outl. Agric., 10, 184–190Google Scholar
  4. HEYDECKER, W. (1974). Germination of an idea: the priming of seeds, University of Nottingham School of Agriculture Report for 1973–74, pp. 50–67Google Scholar
  5. HEYDECKER, W. (1977). Seeds of success, Sci. Hort., 28, 100–115Google Scholar
  6. KASASIAN, L. (1971). Weed Control in the Tropics, Leonard Hill, London, p. 307Google Scholar
  7. MAFF (1979). Weed Control in Potatoes, 1979, leaflet RPG 22, Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food, London, p. 20Google Scholar
  8. MAFF, (1979). Chemical Weed Control in Vegetables, 1979, leaflet HVC 28 (+ 1980 Supplement), Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food, London, p. 39Google Scholar
  9. ROMANOWSKI, R. R. (1977). Integrated weed control in upland crops, in Integrated Control of Weeds (eds. J. D. Fryer and S. Matsunaka), University Of Tokyo Press, Tokyo, p. 262Google Scholar
  10. SALTER, P. J. and DARBY, R. J. (1976). Synchronization of germination of celery seeds, Ann. appl. Biol., 84, 415–424CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. SALTER, P. J., CURRAH, I.E. and FELLOWS, J. R. (1979). The effects of plant density, spatial arrangement and time of harvest on yield and root size in carrots, J. agric. Sci., Camb., 93, 431–440CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Further Reading

  1. Annual reports of research stations such as National Vegetable Research Station, Wellesbourne, Scottish Crops Research Institute, Invergowrie, Dundee and Weed Research Organization, Yarnton, Oxford. Current Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food bulletins and leafletsGoogle Scholar
  2. EDDOWES, M. (1976). Crop Production in Europe, Oxford University Press, London, p. 318Google Scholar
  3. FRYER, J.D. and MAKEPEACE, R. J. (eds.) (1977). Weed Control Handbook, vol. 1, Principles, Blackwell, Oxford, p. 510Google Scholar
  4. FRYER, J.D. and MAKEPEACE, R. J. (eds.) (1978). Weed Control Handbook, vol. II, Recommendations, Blackwell, Oxford, p. 532Google Scholar
  5. HEYDECKER, W. and COOLBEAR, P. (1977). Seed treatments for improved performance — survey and attempted prognosis, Seed Sci. Technol., 5, 353–425Google Scholar
  6. MAKEPEACE, R. J. and HOLROYD, J. (1978). Weed control, in The Potato Crop (ed. P. M. Harris), Chapman and Hall, London, p. 730Google Scholar
  7. MERCADO, B. L. (1979). Introduction to Weed Science, Southeast Asian Regional Center for Graduate Study and Research in Agriculture, Laguna, Philippines, 292 pp.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© R. J. Stephens 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. J. Stephens
    • 1
  1. 1.School of Biological SciencesUniversity of BathUK

Personalised recommendations