Weed Control in Turf, Ornamentals and Forest Trees

  • R. J. Stephens
Chapter

Abstract

Grass sward fulfils many roles as a ground cover in gardens, on open spaces in town and country, on sports fields and beside roads, motorways and railways. Turf provides a good walking surface, is easily established from seed or by turfing and extensive areas can be maintained relatively cheaply by grazing or mowing. The species composition and method of management can be varied to produce a turf suitable for many different purposes. Because so many types of grass surface are required, the concept of weeds in turf is not easily defined. For example, small broad-leaved plants in flower add interest to grass in large open spaces, whereas the same species would be unacceptable in bowling greens or in small formal gardens. In some open spaces the greater part of the area may be encouraged to grow as an attractive meadow of grasses and broad-leaved species, public access being by paths that are more frequently mown. Fast growing, vigorous grasses such as Perennial Rye-grass (Lolium perenne) that recover quickly from damage are desirable on football pitches but would be out of place in fine lawns. The weed status of some annual grasses, particularly Annual Meadow-grass (Poa annua), is more difficult to define as these species often provide the only grass cover in poorly maintained turf.

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Further Reading

  1. HARDCASTLE, J. E. Y. (ed.) (1980). Chemical Weed Control in Your Garden, Grower Books, London, p. 24Google Scholar
  2. PROCEEDINGS OF Conference on Weed Control in Amenity Plantings, University of Bath, 1980, compiled by R. J. Stephens and P. R. Thoday, p. 88Google Scholar
  3. RORISON, I. H. and HUNT, R. (1980). Amenity Grassland: an Ecological Perspective, Wiley, Chichester, p. 272Google Scholar

Copyright information

© R. J. Stephens 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. J. Stephens
    • 1
  1. 1.School of Biological SciencesUniversity of BathUK

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