The Costs of the Cocaine Industry to Andean Society

  • Patrick L. Clawson
  • Rensselaer W. LeeIII

Abstract

Cocaine obviously brings a great many advantages to Andean economies. It is the largest single source of foreign exchange in Colombia, Bolivia, and Peru. It probably contributes more to gross national product than does any other single industry in Colombia, and it is among the top industries if not the largest in Bolivia and Peru. It employs directly some 500,000 workers throughout the region. Thanks to cocaine, a few of the largest traffickers are billionaires. And these are just some of the more obvious advantages; there are also second-order advantages, some of which are discussed herein.

Keywords

Ethyl Acetone Income Cocaine Sulfuric Acid 

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Notes

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Copyright information

© Patrick L. Clawson and Rensselaer W. Lee III 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Patrick L. Clawson
  • Rensselaer W. LeeIII

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