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Rethinking the Philosophy of Central—Local Relations in Post-Central-Planning Vietnam

  • Thaveeporn Vasavakul
Part of the International Political Economy Series book series (IPES)

Abstract

Studies of comparative socialism in general, and Vietnamese socialism in particular, have highlighted the centralized character of the socialist state. Theda Skocpol’s influential States and Social Revolutions concludes that the major outcome of the revolutions in France, Russia and China was the emergence of a state structure that was more centralized, bureaucratic and mass-incorporating (Skocpol 1979). Studies on the political systems of socialist countries after World War II are no exception. Employing the vocabulary of totalitarianism, Stalinism or state socialism, they have similarly emphasized the centralized character of these states. In the case of Vietnam, Gareth Porter’s Vietnam: The Politics of Bureaucratic Socialism exemplifies this approach (Porter 1993).

Keywords

Central Government Central Planning Administrative Level Fiscal Decentralization Administrative State 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Mark Turner 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • Thaveeporn Vasavakul

There are no affiliations available

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