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Children Need but Mothers Only Want: the Power of ‘Needs Talk’ in the Constitution of Childhood

  • Steph Lawler
Part of the Explorations in Sociology. British Sociological Association Conference Volume Series book series (EIS)

Abstract

Childhood, according to Stainton Rogers and Stainton Rogers (1992), is ‘knowledged into being’. In other words, and claims for the ‘naturalness’ of childhood notwithstanding, the temporal period bracketed off as ‘childhood’ is a social creation, whose inhabitants are marked as ‘other’ to the world of adults (Prout and James, 1990; Hockey and James, 1993; Jenks, 1996). This social creation is forged on the basis of the knowledges which surround childhood and which produce the ‘truths’ by which childhood is ‘known’ (Walkerdine, 1990; Rose, 1991; Stainton Rogers and Stainton Rogers, 1992). These knowledges, which claim to be describing a pre-existing category of ‘childhood’, can be seen as producing this category. They generate schemata of understanding through which the individuals marked as ‘children’ come to be known and understood.

Keywords

Good Mother Press Coverage Emphasis Mine Lesbian Mother Standard Occupational Classification 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© British Sociological Association 1999

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  • Steph Lawler

There are no affiliations available

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