Making Visible the Invisible?

  • Peter Francis
  • Pamela Davies
  • Victor Jupp

Abstract

Having digested the breadth, range and focus of the particular chapters contained within this volume the reader should by now be acutely aware of the complexity of the task we set ourselves. Also, having contracted, collated and edited the various contributions over the past year or so, we are also now much more aware of the complexity of the task we set ourselves! To recap, that task was to critically review a range of acts and events taking place at the end of the twentieth century which in our view remained to a greater or lesser extent hidden, and to map their particular contours under the generic title Invisible Crimes: Their Victims and Their Regulation.

Keywords

Expense Allo Milton Kerb 

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Copyright information

© Peter Francis, Pamela Davies and Victor Jupp 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • Peter Francis
    • 1
  • Pamela Davies
    • 2
  • Victor Jupp
    • 3
  1. 1.University of NorthumbriaNewcastleUK
  2. 2.University of NorthumbriaNewcastleUK
  3. 3.University of NorthumbriaNewcastleUK

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