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Food Security in China: Self-Sufficiency or International Cooperation?

  • Ross Garnaut
Part of the Studies on the Chinese Economy book series (STCE)

Abstract

The Chinese people are now both more numerous and better fed than ever before in their history. This is not to say that every person in the People’s Republic is adequately fed. But there is no spectre of famine haunting every delay or excess of rain, any failure in management of the flow of water from the great rivers, or any weakness in the administration of the movement of grain from regions of abundance to regions of want. After 18 years of economic reform, for the overwhelming bulk of the Chinese people the quantity, quality and variety of food available is well beyond the margins of subsistence, providing a buffer against harder times.

Keywords

Food Security Free Trade Trade Policy Trade Liberalisation Chinese People 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Palgrave Macmillan, a division of Macmillan Publishers Limited 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ross Garnaut

There are no affiliations available

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