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Education

  • Rodney Lowe
Chapter
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Abstract

Education initially attracted as much popular enthusiasm as the NHS and, until the 1970s at least, it was more successful in attracting public finance. Its exceptional degree of political support was demonstrated by the fact that the 1944 Education Bill was the only major piece of reconstruction legislation to be enacted during the war and, in its wake, public opinion was recorded as providing ‘overwhelming support for extra expenditure on education’.1 The war thus reversed, if only temporarily, the widespread popular indifference — and even hostility — to education which had followed the introduction of compulsory schooling in 1880. Because, of full employment, children’s earnings were no longer so vital to family income and consequently many parents were able for the first time to regard education not as a short-term financial loss but as an opportunity for their children to secure a good job and hence long-term financial security.

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Notes and References

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Copyright information

© Rodney Lowe 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • Rodney Lowe
    • 1
  1. 1.University of BristolUK

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