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Drought and Famine in Eastern Sudan: The Socio-Cultural Dimension

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Abstract

This paper deals with a specific geographical location in the Horn of Africa, — the Red Sea Area of eastern Sudan. Only one group of the area’s numerous tribal and ethnic groups will be the focus of discussion: the Beja.

Keywords

Specific Geographical Location Annual Workshop Household Unit Relief Distribution Capparis Decidua 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© OSSREA 1998

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