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Introduction

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Abstract

This book explores the character of animal welfare policymaking in Britain and the United States. Comparative public policy has been defined as the study of ‘how, why, and to what extent different governments pursue particular courses of action or inactron’.l In the same tradition, this study seeks to ask who makes decisions impinging on the well-being of animals, who attempts to influence these decisions, why certain decisions are taken rather than others, how legitimate these decisions are and whether there has been a historical shift in the pattern of decision-making.

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Notes

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© 1998 Robert Garner

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Garner, R. (1998). Introduction. In: Political Animals. Palgrave Macmillan, London. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-349-26438-4_1

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