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Renewal and Tradition in the New Politics of Production

  • Paul Stewart
  • Miguel Martinez Lucio
Chapter
Part of the Critical Perspectives on Work and Organisations book series (CPWO)

Abstract

Organisational sociology and labour process debates on contemporary managerial changes to workplace institutions have tended to view teamworking as either work enhancing or work controlling (Babson, 1995; Waddington and Whitston, 1996). In the first instance we can distinguish approaches to teamworking which see it variously as: a new form of employee representation (Pils and Macduffie 1997); a novel way of organising the production and organisation process (Mueller, 1994); and as directly constituting a new form of employee autonomy (Adler, 1997 and 1998). Moreover, there are also concerns raised about the effects of teamwork and the way it presents us with a new logic of participation and control (Babson, 1995; Lewchuk and Robertson, 1996; Stephenson, 1996). However, there is also a school of thought which argues that we may be overstating developments with respect to discontinuities in this area (Frohlich and Pekruhl, 1995).

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Copyright information

© Paul Stewart and Miguel Martinez Lucio 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • Paul Stewart
  • Miguel Martinez Lucio

There are no affiliations available

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