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Chinese Immigrants in Central and Eastern Europe: The Cases of the Czech Republic, Hungary and Romania

  • International Organization for Migration

Keywords

Czech Republic Chinese Immigrant Migration Policy Chinese Community Work Permit 
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References

  1. Capital (1994) ‘The Chinese Drop Penetrates the Bucharest Market: Half the Chinese entering Romania settle here for good’, Capital, 1994, p. 1.Google Scholar
  2. Czech Directorate of Alien and Border Police (1994) ‘Information on Migration on Czech Republic Territory in 1994’ (Prague: Czech Ministry of the Interior).Google Scholar
  3. Demeter, Zayzon Maria (1994) A budapesti népésg nemzetiségi, etnikai arculata [A Profile of the nationality and ethnic background of the Budapest population] (Budapest: Humanitas Civitatis).Google Scholar
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Copyright information

© Gregor Benton and Frank N. Pieke 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • International Organization for Migration

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