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The Philippines in the Regional Division of Labour

  • Aniceto C. OrbetaJr
  • Maria Teresa C. Sanchez
Part of the International Labour Organization (ILO) Century Series book series

Abstract

The Philippines is a country rich in natural and human resources. Agriculture has traditionally been and is still very important for the Philippine economy. In addition, the country boasts one of the highest tertiary enrolment rates in the region, even paralleling some of the high income economies. Yet, despite progress in the last couple of years, the economic performance of the Philippines has been disappointing relative to the other economies in East and Southeast Asia. The average annual GDP growth rate and the growth rate of exports between 1980 and 1993 were far lower than its ASEAN counterparts. In the international and regional division of labour, moreover, rather than attracting the higher value added, more skill-intensive jobs, the Philippines is competing with Thailand, Indonesia and Malaysia, countries with lower overall school enrolment rates, for foreign investment which seeks cheap and low skilled labour (see Table 8.1).

Keywords

Foreign Direct Investment Garment Industry Special Economic Zone Regional Division Foreign Direct Investment Flow 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© International Institute for Labour Studies 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Aniceto C. OrbetaJr
  • Maria Teresa C. Sanchez

There are no affiliations available

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