Environmental Protection Policies and Programmes in India, 1972–95

  • O. P. Dwivedi

Abstract

Even though India has a rich tradition of environmental conservation, which formerly took the form of respect for nature and the presence of divinity in it, large-scale environmental degradation has resulted from population pressures, industrialisation and the indiscriminate use of forest areas for fuel, power generation and irrigation purposes. The writings of sages who stressed the need for human beings to live in close harmony with nature have not been followed. Similarly the pronouncements of Emperor Ashoka — who viewed the protection of animal life and the preservation of plants as one of the duties of the king and forbade the killing and hunting of a number of animals for food and game — and the teachings of Buddhism and Jainism could not prevent decades of environmental destruction.

Keywords

Shipping Coherence Assure Sewage Expense 

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Notes and References

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    For background information see O. P. Dwivedi, ‘India: Pollution Control Policy and Programmes’, International Review of Administrative Sciences, vol. 43, no. 2 (1977), pp. 123–33.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
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Copyright information

© O. P. Dwivedi 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • O. P. Dwivedi
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Political StudiesUniversity of GuelphCanada

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