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Industrial Organization

  • Robert Castley
Chapter

Abstract

After the Second World War the Japanese ‘were seeking to build an integrated production network that could compete on price grounds against America and Europe. They wanted to copy the American system and then surpass the United States in manufacturing efficiency ... Japanese large industrialists deliberately copied and then enhanced an American-style mass production in the auto and the other machinery sectors’.1 The more ‘flexible’ Japanese firms ‘fragmented market tastes by creating and responding to specialized consumer needs. As consumers became aware of the possibilities of distinctive products, they began to demand more carefully tailored goods. Increasingly success came to depend on creating or catering to submarkets in what formerly had been homogeneous mass markets’.2

Keywords

Small Firm Large Firm Foreign Firm Japanese Firm Parent Firm 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Robert Castley 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Robert Castley
    • 1
  1. 1.Faculty of Economics and Social StudiesUniversity of ManchesterUK

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